Worthy Causes

Native American Cultural Awareness and Education

Lillian Pitt actively supports a broad range of efforts aimed at advancing Native American cultural awareness and education. Her efforts help people understand the important contributions and lifeways of Native American people.

Lillian has served on numerous museum boards and special committees related to Native American cultural awareness. She has also given numerous public talks, and she has been an active contributor to events aimed at educating young people about their cultural heritage. She asks that others contribute, as they are able, in helping to build Native American cultural awareness in their own communities and schools.


Two areas of particular interest to Lillian at this time are the Confluence Education Project and the Columbia River Fishers Memorial.

Columbia River Fishers Memorial

The Fishers Memorial project is focused on honoring the many fishers who have lost their lives while fishing on the Columbia River. The Columbia River is known historically, by Native Americans in the region, as N’Chi Wana, or the Big River.

Under tribal leadership, a group of Warm Springs, Yakama, Umatilla, and Nez Perce artists have designed a culturally significant monument to memorialize lost fishers. The memorial also provides a place for families to express their grief, and to encourage safety for all who use the river.

Learn more about the Columbia River Fishers Memorial project by clicking here: Columbia River Fishers Memorial.

Confluence in the Classroom Education Program

Confluence in the Classroom is focused on connecting K-12 students with Native American artists and other keepers of Native American traditions. Participants engage in a range of projects related to the Columbia River system. The goal is to encourage a deeper understanding of place and self through hands-on cultural experiences.

Learn more about the Confluence in the Classroom Education Program

Building understanding of Native American cultures…

I enjoy helping people get in touch with their heritage.

I think it helps people to develop a better sense of who they are. In turn, I think this can help people to make better contributions to the world we live in today.

—Lillian Pitt